What makes a children’s eye doctor different from an adult eye doctor?

Iam very privileged to have been trained in both fields, and I specifically underwent detailed training in the assessment and treatment of children’s eye conditions in London and Cambridge. A children’s eye doctor needs to have a particular repertoire of skills and, most importantly, has to enjoy working with kids and must be able to get on with them and communicate with them on their level. As well, a good children’s eye doctor must be able to explain things to their parents and what the parents need to do regarding aftercare.

What makes a children’s eye doctor different from an adult eye doctor? Children cannot be assessed like adults. A children’s eye doctor needs to have a particular repertoire of skills and most importantly must enjoy working with kids and has to communicate on the level of the children.

We cannot assess children like we assess adults; as you can imagine, children of six months, a year, or even three years may not yet know their alphabet, will not be so keen on obeying instructions and can have limited attention spans. We use a variety of different techniques, which are well practised and well proven, to assess the vision of the eyes, evaluate the movement of the eyes, and perform a full and careful examination of the eyes. An eye examination usually involves putting in eye drops to widen the pupils: this allows us to examine the eye from front to back and ensures that our treatment is as comprehensive and quick as it needs to be. It also makes it possible to measure the focusing of the eyes and whether the child might need glasses because their vision is quite blurry. I often work with an allied health professional called an orthoptist, and the orthoptist helps me measure the different eye movements and take measurements of any squint that may or may not be present. Altogether, you should expect your child’s eye appointment to last at least an hour because it is very detailed, very comprehensive, and we take our time. We don’t rush because when we rush, the child gets upset and the results are not as good.

By |2017-09-29T15:59:41+00:00January 4th, 2018|Children's Eye Conditions, Eye Conditions|Comments Off on What makes a children’s eye doctor different from an adult eye doctor?

About the Author:

I am a Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon with over 15 years of experience. I have comprehensive training in the management of various eye diseases. My particular specialist interests include cataract, strabismus and laser eye surgery. My belief is that the patient must be confident in their Eye Doctor and comfortable with the care they are receiving.